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The massacre of Indian nationalists at Jallianwala Bagh; Britain must apologise

As we’re stepping into the 100th anniversary of Jallianwala Bagh massacre, it once again reminds us how inhuman the ideology of British colonialism was

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Baisakhi is a religious and cultural festival in India, mostly celebrated by the Punjabi people. But the Baisakhi day (April 13) of 1919 was not happened to be a day of celebrations for Indians as it turned out to be the historical date for one of the most inhuman massacres in India.

Michael O’Dwyer was the British Lieutenant-Governor of Punjab at the time of Jallianwala Bagh massacre, and he approved Reginald Dyer’s actions

The Westerners call it Amritsar massacre, and for Indians, it is Jallianwala Bagh massacre. One of the most important episodes in Indian history which acted as a catalyst for India’s struggle for freedom, inspiring young revolutionaries including Bhagat Singh to take on the British by sacrificing their lives at the altar of motherland.

‘The Martyr’s’ well at Jallianwala Bagh/Wikimedia Commons

The ideology of hatred has little space in a progressive society. But, the so-called advocates of development, the colonial Britishers, had no idea about the meaning of humanity in its real sense. Here is a fact-sheet about the Jallianwala Bagh massacre:

>> The Jallianwala Bagh massacre took place on 13 April 1919 in Amritsar, Punjab

>> The park was occupied by Baishakhi pilgrims and civilians to celebrate Baishakhi and to protest the arrest and deportation of two national leaders, Satya Pal and Dr Saifuddin Kitchlew

>> Colonel Reginald Dyer was the villain of the story. He was the inhuman officer who fired rifles into the civilian crowd. Col Dyer was the acting military commander for Amritsar

>> According to the British Government, 79 dead and 1,200 wounded in the tragedy. But unofficial sources claimed that over 1,000 innocent people were killed in the cold-blooded massacre

The Jallianwalla Bagh in 1919/Wikimedia Commons

The mastermind

Michael O’Dwyer was the mastermind behind the massacre. He was the British Lieutenant-Governor of Punjab at the time of Jallianwala Bagh massacre, and he approved Reginald Dyer’s brutal actions.

Udham Singh, one of the popular revolutionaries in the post Jallianwala Bagh era who himself wounded in the massacre, killed Michael O’Dwyer on 13 March 1940, at Caxton Hall in London.

After that, Singh became the hero for revolutionaries who avenged the British for the innocent lives who sacrificed for Mother India at Jallianwala Bagh.

The Indic Post view

We think that Britain must apologise for Jallianwala Bagh massacre as London Mayor Sadiq Khan said it openly last year.

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History

Remembering Jallianwala Bagh massacre and the sacrifice of nationalists

All you need to know about the British era massacre that left hundreds dead

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Image source: Wikimedia Commons

On April 10, 2019, British Prime Minister Theresa May expressed regret for the Jallianwala Bagh massacre, one of the most horrific events in the history of pre-independent India, which is apparently good enough to define the ruthlessness of the British rule in the country.

As this year marks 100 th anniversary of the heinous massacre, the demand has been strong from multiple quarters to force the Britain formally declare an apology for Jallianwala Bagh massacre. But they didn’t. Amid the Brexit chaos, May just said she was sad about the in-humaneness by her forerunners.

What is Jallianwala Bagh massacre

Baisakhi is a religious and cultural festival in India, mostly celebrated by the Punjabi people. But the Baisakhi day (April 13) of 1919 was not happened to be a day of celebrations for Indians as it turned out to be the historical date for one of the most heartless butcheries the world has ever seen.

Udham Singh, one of the popular revolutionaries in the post-Jallianwala Bagh era who himself wounded in the massacre, killed Michael O’Dwyer on 13 March 1940, at Caxton Hall in London

Michael O’Dwyer was the British Lieutenant-Governor of Punjab at the time of Jallianwala Bagh massacre, and he approved Reginald Dyer’s actions on unarmed Indians.  

The Jallianwalla Bagh in 1919/Wikimedia Commons

The Westerners call it Amritsar massacre, and for Indians, it is Jallianwala Bagh massacre. It is one of the most significant episodes in Indian history that acted as a catalyst for the country’s struggle for freedom, inspiring young revolutionaries including Bhagat Singh to take on the British by sacrificing their lives at the altar of motherland.

‘The Martyr’s’ well at Jallianwala Bagh/Wikimedia Commons

The ideology of hatred has little space in a progressive society. But, the so-called advocates of development, the colonial Britishers, had no idea about the meaning of humanity in its real sense. Here is a fact-sheet about the Jallianwala Bagh massacre:

>> The Jallianwala Bagh massacre took place on 13 April 1919 in Amritsar, Punjab

>> The park was occupied by Baishakhi pilgrims and civilians to celebrate Baishakhi and to protest the arrest and deportation of two national leaders, Satya Pal and Dr Saifuddin Kitchlew

>> Colonel Reginald Dyer was the villain of the story. He was the cold-hearted officer who fired rifles into the civilian crowd. Col Dyer was then the acting military commander for Amritsar

>> According to the British Government, 379 dead and 1,200 wounded in the Britain-made ‘catastrophe’. But unofficial sources claimed that over 1,000 innocent people were killed in the heinous action


Colonel Reginald Dyer was the villain of the story. He was the cold-hearted officer who fired rifles into the civilian crowd


The mastermind

Michael O’Dwyer was the mastermind behind the massacre. He was the British Lieutenant-Governor of Punjab at the time of Jallianwala Bagh massacre, and he approved Reginald Dyer’s vicious act

Udham Singh, one of the popular revolutionaries in the post-Jallianwala Bagh era who himself wounded in the massacre, killed Michael O’Dwyer on 13 March 1940, at Caxton Hall in London.

After that, Singh became the hero for revolutionaries who avenged the British for the innocent lives who sacrificed for Mother India at Jallianwala Bagh.

This is the modified version of an article on the same topic published on April 13, 2018 in The Indic Post.

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Tributes to the nationalist writer Bankim Chandra Chatterjee who gave us Vande Mataram

He was the man who created Anandamath to give us Vande Mataram through the path of Sannyasi Rebellion

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Bankim Chandra Chatterjee/Wikimedia Commons

Bankim Chandra Chatterjee was one of the most celebrated novelists in India who called for the rise of nationalism in the age of invaders. He was an exceptional writer, poet, and journalist, known for his contribution of Vande Mataram as the national song, which inspired thousands of revolutionaries to give up their lives for Mother India.

Bankim Chandra was born in a Bengali Brahmin family to Yadav Chandra Chattopadhyaya and Durgadebi on June 27, 1838 in Naihati of West Bengal.


He was the man who created Anandamath to give us Vande Mataram through the path of Sannyasi Rebellion


Completed his education from Hooghly Mohsin College and Presidency College, Kolkata, Bankim Chandra had a great mission to spearhead the literary renaissance in Bengal.

As a writer, Kapalkundala, which was published in 1866, was Bankim Chandra’s first major work.

Bankim’s political novel Anandamath, published in 1882, was the decisive moment in his life, inspiring the saga of India’s national movement.

Anandamath is the story of a Sannyasi (Saints) rebellion, where the Sannyasis taking on the British in the 18th century to protect their motherland.

It was based on the devastating Bengal famine of 1770, Bankim Chandra wrote Anandamath.

From this novel, India got its national song Vande Mataram, the powerful mantra that had shaken the roots British rule in India.  

The novel was banned by the British, and it was lifted only after independence.

The great poet died on 8 April 1894, and Sri Aurobindo once said, “Bankim created a language, a literature, and a nation.

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20 facts about Bhagat Singh that every Indian should know

The ideals of Arya Samaj heavily influenced Bhagat Singh in his childhood days as his grandfather Arjun Singh was a staunch follower of Swami Dayananda Saraswati

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Illustration/Jijin M K/The Indic Post/Media Ink

This March 23 marks 88th martyrdom of Bhagat Singh, Sukhdev Thapar and Shivaram Rajguru, three revolutionary patriots who had inspired thousands of youth to take on the British rule in India.

Bhagat Singh, indeed, an immortal revolutionary India has ever seen, had become a symbol of Indian youth in the pre-independence period, deviating the path of Mohandas Gandhi’s non-violence Bhagat had a strong conviction that only through revolution India can attain freedom.

Born on September 28, 1907, Bhagat Singh gave an entirely new dimension to India’s freedom struggle, stirring thousands of youth to fight against the British with an undiluted spirit of patriotism.

The biased historians didn’t take Bhagat’s unmatched contributions into consideration when writing the history of India’s independence movement. But, Bhagat has been a true hero to the masses and a household name among Indians.

Here’re 20 things one needs to know about the life of Bhagat Singh

Born in September 1907 to Kishan Singh and Vidyavati at Banga village of Jaranwala Tehsil in Lyallpur district, Punjab

Bhagat Singh’s father Kishan Singh was politically active, and closely associated with Ghadar Party

Ghadar Party was a revolutionary organisation spearheaded by leaders like Bhai Parmanand, Har Dayal, and Kartar Singh Sarabha

Illustration/Jijin MK/The Indic Post/Media Ink

During childhood days, Bhagat was heavily influenced by the ideals of Arya Samaj as his grandfather Arjun Singh was a staunch follower of Swami Dayananda Saraswati

As Bhagat’s family had strong leanings to the nationalist movement, they sent him to Dayanand Anglo-Vedic High School, an institution under Arya Samaj

At the age of 12, in 1919, Bhagat Singh visited the site of the Jallianwala Bagh massacre, and decided to dedicate his life for Mother India

Bhagat was critical of Mohandas Gandhi’s idea of non-violence as a tool against the British.

Inspired by the idea of revolution, he founded a socialist organisation called Naujawan Bharat Sabha in 1926

Bhagat Singh joined the Hindustan Republican Association and got in touch with revolutionaries include Chandrashekhar Azad, Ram Prasad Bismil and Ashfaqallah Khan, and that was the real turning point

In 1928, Hindustan Republican Association (HRA) was renamed as Hindustan Socialist Republican Association (HSRA), marking a new phase in the revolutionary activities against the British

The Simon Commission visited Lahore on 30 October 1928 to report on the political scenario in India. A commission to report on India without an Indian member made the nationalists dissatisfied and Indian leaders protested under the grat Lala Lajpat Rai.

The British addressed the protest with iron hands and it led to death of Lala Lajpat Rai.

HSRA decided to avenge the death of Lala Lajpat Rai, and Bhagat along with Shivaram Rajguru, Sukhdev Thapar, and Chandrashekhar Azad made a plan to kill James A Scott, the police officer who ordered the lathi charge against the nationalists

Instead of Scott, Bhagat and team shot John P Saunders, an Assistant Superintendent of Police in Lahore on 17 December 1928

It was on 8 April 1929, Bhagat with Batukeshwar Dutt threw bombs into the Central Legislative Assembly. The aim was not to kill anyone, but just to to protest against the Public Safety Bill and the Trade Dispute Act, and also to get publicise their cause of movement

Bhagat was given a life sentence. But with the unearthing of HSRA bomb factories in Lahore and Saharanpur by the police in 1929, and the arrest of Sukhdev, Kishori Lal, and Jai Gopal made the British to correlate Assembly Bombing and Saunders murder

The court sentenced Bhagat Singh, Rajguru and Sukhdev to death in the Lahore case.

The order was them to be hanged on 24 March 1931

But the British did it before 11 hours. Bhagat Singh, Rajguru and Sukhdev sacrificed their lives at the altar of the Motherland on 23 March 1931

Shivram Rajguru was only 22 when he was hanged. Bhagat and Sukhdev were 23.

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